Month: May 2017

Crank – Ellen Hopkins

Posted on Updated on

Crank(hopkins)

 

I couldn’t put this book down. I bought it from Goodwill a few weeks ago for like a buck. Sometimes I like to have a quick read right after I finish a book that has taken me awhile to get through. It breaks up the monotony a little bit.

Hopkins wrote this book as a tribute to her daughter–who was addicted to “crank” or meth. There is a sequel called Glass so I’m not sure what happens to her daughter yet. I’ll definitely be reading that when I have time. The book is written in poem format–each “chapter” is a different poem, but they flow in chronological order and it’s not so abstract that you don’t know what she’s talking about. I’m not one for poetry most of the time, but I liked the way she did this one. It was a way to tell a very sad story in a very creative way.

The book is written from the point of view of the daughter–Kristina, or as she likes to call herself when she is high–Bree. For the sake of clarity, I’ll call her Bree. Bree is your typical 16 year old girl who stays out of trouble most of the time, but then she goes to stay with her father for the summer, who is an addict. She meets a guy named Adam, who introduces her to the monster. The monster is what Bree calls meth. When she returns home to her mother and stepfather’s house, she is heartbroken over having to leave Adam, and she has no access to the monster.  The rest of the story is about Bree going to any lengths to find crank and will hang out/do anything with anyone who will give it to her. This eventually leads to her downward spiral–details I won’t reveal.

As I said before, I really liked the format of this book. It breaks up your typical novel and your eyes dart all over the page, much like Bree’s probably do when she is high on the monster. As someone who has never tried drugs, I’ve always wondered why someone would want to do them in the first place–what is the attraction? I thought Hopkins did a nice job of depicting the attraction–the high highs of meth, while also portraying the crashes and burns of coming off a high. We also see the desperate need for more and more, and the effects it has on Bree’s relationships with everyone around her.

I thought this was an excellent book, especially for impressionable teenagers and high school teachers. I also think if you liked Thirteen Reasons Why, this might be a good read for you as well.

5/5

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time – Mark Haddon

Posted on Updated on

41bz6juMwiL__SX323_BO1,204,203,200_

I have to be honest, I didn’t much like this book. I felt like it had the same sort of idea (or reminded me of Flowers for Algernon, which is one of my favorite books–so I had a hard time liking this one. I do think it was well researched and you could tell it was clearly written from experience, as I believe Haddon worked with special needs children. (I could be wrong).

The story is told from the point of view of the main character–Christopher Boone, who is on the autism spectrum. He is a 15 year old boy who find his neighbor’s dog dead from a pitch-fork wound. The story begins with his narration of finding the dog and also his detective work to find out who did it. The book is written in sort of a diary format, so each day is titled with the next prime number in sequence, because Christopher loves math. That’s one of the reasons I disliked the book, because he’s good at math so there are a lot of complicated algorithms and math problems that he depicts in his story–most of which I don’t understand. But maybe that’s the point–Christopher doesn’t always understand social norms or puns, but he does understand things that are logical that most people can’t.

The majority of the book is about his complicated relationship with his parents, who are divorced. Christopher lives with his father, who is just trying to keep it together after his wife apparently died. Christopher and his father are more like roommates–his father feeds him but they don’t really do much together so Christopher is alone most of the time, which he prefers.

I liked the fact that this story was told from the perspective of an autistic teenager. I felt like it gave me a glimpse into his mind and what kinds of things he likes and dislikes. There wasn’t always a reason given behind why he didn’t like something–like the color yellow; however, he clearly spelled out the reactions he would have to things he disliked.

2.5/5